How Freelancing Changed My Life

I love freelancing. I love everything about freelancing. The best thing about freelancing? FREEDOM! My life is changed when I started freelancing and I love the changes!

Here’s how freelancing has changed my life, so far:

Time Management

I think this is the most important aspect of all. I can manage time better when I get to control my own working hours. I get to do more every day!

Health Improvement

I used to get ill really often when I was working in retail, and it was terrible (who wants to get ill anyway?). I spent quite a fortune on medical expenses and I hated it. Now, my health has improved tremendously, physically and mentally. Truly loving my life!

Relationship Improvement

I hardly had any time to spend with my family when I was working in retail due to the long working hours but now I get to hang out with family and friends all the time. It is very important for me to spend time with my parents (after all, we are not getting any younger!).

Personal Growth

I have always wanted to study Psychology and I got the chance two years after I started freelancing. I am taking it slow and steady but I am definitely getting there! Apart from that, I have learned so much from mentors around the world such as Problogger. I truly enjoyed the experience and happy to gain more knowledge every day.

New Opportunities

Freelancing has opened many doors for me, and it never ceases to amaze me. It is a wonderful journey and I get to meet many new friends around the world.

CONCLUSION

Freelancing has much to offer to those who seek freedom and change of lifestyle. If you are considering a change of career, it is never too late to start freelancing.

 

Identifying Freelancing Scams

I have written in general about Freelancing Scams in 2009 and this post is an updated version.

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In 2009, I have discussed a few ways to identify freelancing scams. However, 2013 is approaching and this is the perfect time to revise some of the most common scams in the freelancing industry.

Common Signs of Scam

Unique Article as Sample

Situation: Employer will request a unique article sample (NOTE: if you are a designer, you might be asked to present a unique logo design as a sample).

Reality: You are providing a piece of unique work for nothing.Personal View: Personally I have experienced this in my early months. I have written a few articles, sent them to the so-called employer and never get paid.

Payment Out of System

Situation: Freelancing sites such as Freelancer.com and Elance.com require payment through their system. Any payment out of the system is a breach of their terms and conditions. Now, some employers prefer to pay out of the system to avoid fees.

Reality: Most employers who seek payment out of the system are scammers. They do not have the intention of paying at all. It is not recommended to accept payment out of the system for first-time clients (employers).

Brief Job Description

Situation: The job description is too general.

Reality: It is usually fake (although not always).

Low Pay

Situation: You are being offered low rate (e.g. $1 for 500 words).

Reality: First, they just want to save money. Secondly, they are fooling you into thinking that you are worth such rate because you are “new”.

Too Good To Be True

Situation: You smell something fishy.

Reality: Trust your instinct. Chances are you are right, there’s something wrong.

Pay First Scheme

Situation: You are required to pay in order to “secure” the job.

Reality: Once they received your payment, they will disappear into the thin air.

Revenue Sharing

Situation: You are required to submit articles and your earning depends on the traffic to your articles and the number of clicks on the ads.

Reality: If you don’t mind writing for peanuts, you might want to try this. However, in most cases, they are fraud.

Personal View: I have tried on Triond. While the earning is rather low, but at least they pay as promised, every month.

Newbie Trap

Situation: In exchange of “experience”, you are required to work for low pay or no pay.

Reality: They are insisting on the fact that you are “new” and to lure you into thinking that you are gaining “experience”, you are required to work on low pay or no pay. In other words, this is a waste of time and total scam.

Conclusion

Please beware of the signs when looking for freelance jobs / gigs / work

How Long Can You Survive Your Freelancing Career

Have you thought about how long can you survive as a freelance writer?

It just came to me recently as I am very active being a virtual assistant at the moment.

I am busier as a virtual assistant rather than being a writer as of now.

I believe every beginning has an end but I would not want to end my freelance writing career.

After all, I started out as a freelance writer.

The only solution I can think of is reducing my freelance writing gigs.

At least I would be able to work on something I love.

In my early days as a freelance writer, I thought that freelance writing would be a life-long career for me.

Now that I am also a virtual assistant, I believe there are many other things we can do for a living.

In fact, it is recommended to try expand our career into other areas.

Personally I would really love to venture into e-commerce but will have to take it slow and steady.

How long have you survived your freelancing career?

Mind to share it with us all?

Quit Unemployment and Start Freelancing

Unemployment rate is rising. For some reason I thought that unemployment shouldn’t happen at all.

After all, there are so many full time jobs being advertised on the internet and in the classifieds.

For some reason, there are so many people who are unemployed out there so why not take this chance to get into the freelancing industry?

After all, it is better than being unemployed.

It is not extremely easy to start freelancing but you have to start somewhere.

First, you need the right skills. Secondly, you need a computer or a laptop. Then, you need a job market.

Ask yourself:

“What can you do?”

Writing? Designing? Coding?

These are valuable skills in the freelancing world.

If you love to write, you might want to check out some revenue-sharing sites.

Submit your articles and earn royalties on your articles. You can even do this as a part time job.

Otherwise, you can check out freelance writing job sites.

Be sure to rate yourself reasonably. Check out the right rate for your work.

Once you have determined what you want to do, you should promote your service.

While you are doing freelancing, be sure to avoid scams.

Who knows freelancing might be your dream job?

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I have written a similar article. Check it out: Quit Your Job and Start Freelancing

5 Mistakes I Have Done as a Freelance Writer

I hate to say this but it is true. I have done many mistakes in life, especially when I first started as a freelance writer. Freelancing world is a very tough world. There will be rocks, pebbles and sands along the way. It is very important to be careful but as a new freelance writer, I had no choice but to learn from mistakes.

So, here I present to you in post #261, five mistakes I have done as a freelance writer.

Mistake #1

I willingly agreed to a project rate without initiating a negotiation for a higher rate. Seriously, I thought that I wasn’t in the position to negotiate for a better rate, but I was wrong. As a new freelance writer, we have every right (not “write”) to get a better rate, if the client is offering a very low rate for our hard work. At least negotiate for a reasonable rate. Do not settle for a rate fit for slave.

Mistake #2

Agreed to add in more work but didn’t raise the rate. Silly me! I didn’t know how I can make such a mistake, but I made a mistake and it was a very costly mistake.

Mistake #3

I didn’t request for a deposit. In the end, I didn’t get a full payment at all. I didn’t get paid for the work I have done. Always request for a deposit, for your own financial security.

Mistake #4

I didn’t know I have the right to say “NO”. Seriously, as a freelancer, I have the right to say “NO” :

  • when I don’t want to take any projects
  • when the projects are not suitable / not in line with my work
  • when the projects are not rewarding and time consuming
  • whenever I feel like saying “NO”

You don’t have to say “Yes” all the time.

Mistake #5

Not making a stand about what I do and will not do in a project. I should have stated that my job is to write, not to edit or design anything. When I failed to mention that in a contract or something, I had to do everything way beyond my job description. Be specific about what you do, as you are getting paid to do only what you are told to do in the first place. If your client requires you to add in more work, please refer my Mistake #2.